Tag Archives: letters from whitechapel

Whitehall Mystery is now Available from Fantasy Flight Games

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Sept 13, 2017

Fantasy Flight Games is pleased to announce that Whitehall Mystery is available now!

In the spring of 1888, the slayings of Jack the Ripper shook London. For months, citizens lived in terror until the murderer suddenly disappeared into thin air. His reign of terror was almost forgotten until, in October of that same year, a severed torso was discovered at the construction site of what was to become the New Scotland Yard. This was soon matched to an arm and a leg found at other points around the city, beginning what would become known as the Whitehall Mystery.

Now that the killer has re-emerged, the race is on for investigators to capture saucy Jack and bring him to justice before he fades into the London fog once more, possibly forever.

Whitehall Mystery is a game of bluffing and deduction that transports two to four players to 1888, where the shadow of Jack the Ripper haunts the streets of Victorian London. In this new game of thrilling cat and mouse, Saucy Jack leads the police on a chase through the city’s smoggy streets, leaving macabre mementos for the investigators on his tail.

This new standalone game in the Letters from Whitechapel series gives players the opportunity to play as both Jack the Ripper and the investigators who took on the impossible task of finding him under the ever-increasing scrutiny of the press and the public. The leader of this historic investigation, Sergeant Arthur Ferris leads the hunt as the blue investigator. With the help of surgeon Thomas Bond, the red investigator, and the yellow investigator, journalist Jasper T. C. Waring and his loyal dog, Smoker, there’s nowhere the nefarious criminal can hide.

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Whitehall Mystery Announced by FFG

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June 11, 2017

Fantasy Flight Games is pleased to announce the upcoming release of Whitehall Mystery, the newest addition to the Letters from Whitechapel series. The hunt for history’s most notorious serial killer continues in this streamlined standalone adventure that explores one of London’s most intriguing unsolved cases.

In 1888, construction of the New Scotland Yard in London’s Whitehall District comes to a screeching halt when a woman’s torso is left on the police’s doorstep. Though somewhat out of character with the most recent wave of brutal murders, the grisly nature of the crime can only mean one thing: Jack the Ripper has returned.

This time, the killer emerges with a new game of cat-and-mouse as he plans to leave four more limbs in unknown locations throughout the city. The New Scotland Yard must reach beyond their precinct to assemble a new team of experts to hunt down the monster and bring him to justice. This may be the investigators’ last chance to capture the murderer before he slips away forever.

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Dear Boss expansion for Letters from Whitechapel available now!

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March 5th, 2017

The case has remained unsolved for months. Despite their best efforts, the police are no closer to capturing the shadowy monster terrorizing the Whitechapel district. Letters from the unseen killer taunt the them each time he claims a new victim and disappears into the night, narrowly escaping their clutches. But the police are vigilant. They continue to patrol Whitechapel, hoping to pick up the trail…  

The tense cat-and-mouse action of hunting down Jack the Ripper—or evading the police as Jack himself—returns with Dear Boss, the thrilling expansion for Letters from Whitechapel, available at retailers now!

Dear Boss returns you to the streets of London and the hunt for the enigmatic serial killer known as Jack the Ripper. As the monster continues to prowl Whitechapel, baffling the police and putting residents on edge, Dear Boss gives you new tools to face this terrible threat. Additionally, this new expansion draws you deeper into the historical circumstances surrounding the Ripper killings of 1888 with even more variants than those found in the base game. Alongside the twelve beautifully-sculpted plastic miniatures that replace the Policeman, Jack, and Wretched tokens from the base game, Dear Boss provides the definitive Letters from Whitechapel experience.

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Review : Letters from Whitechapel

Review : Letters from Whitechapel

Originally posted at Anatoli’s Game Room, may 24, 2014
Letters from Whitechapel is a Jack the Ripper themed boardgame where 1 player controls the Ripper while 1-5 players control police officers trying to hunt him down.
It’s a game of cat and mouse where the Ripper has to kill a specific number of victims each night and get back home to the safety of his hidden sanctuary and the Police must do their best to stop him by apprehending him.The basic game is very simple, and to me it was familiar with “Fury Of Dracula”, in both games you have a bad guy that plots his hidden movement behind a screen while the good guys move around on the large map and inspect area locations for clues of whether or not the bad guy had passed through or still is in that specific location. The difference between Fury of Dracula where Dracula has a much more active role and where there is a lot of tooling up your characters and fighting involved – Letters from Whitechapel is stripped of all that and solely focus on the chase.

Police characters as well as the Ripper must adhere to the a strict movement patter marked by a grid (one for the Ripper and one for the Police) on the board. The to make it a bit harder on the Police the Ripper has a few tricks up his sleeve, such as using a coach for double movement, alley and alley movements where he takes a shortcut through a neighborhood. The special movements are limited to a fixed number and varied from turn to turn. Playing the Ripper goes as follows, commit a murder instantly or wait for the prostitutes to move around the map (movement by the Police), once a murder is committed the Ripper must escape back to his lair – and he only has a number of turns at his disposal each night to do so. Should the Ripper fail to get back home the Police wins.

     

The Police move around the map each night, each cop can move 2 spaces on the map and do investigation of nearby numbered locations (one at a time). Should the Police find a clue on any adjacent numbered location then the investigation ends for that particular cop marker. Naturally the Police tries to follow the direction of the clues to determine which way the Ripper is heading and either attempt to cut him off from his supposed lair or decide to “apprehend” the Ripper in a location where he is suspected to be cornered. At the start of each night the cops are allowed to relocate a few of its members on the map but most of the force remains in place which can aid the Ripper as he can start his murder spree and movement next to a prostitute marker (most of the time out of reach) from the Police.

Apparently there are some additional rules for the advanced game mode, making the game easier for either the Ripper or the Police depending on how the rules are played, but the core rules provide enough challenge imo. The map is really well made in how the grid is drawn and the movement possibilities for the Ripper forces the Police to really think through how to move and consider all possible Ripper routes. It may be too much of a challenge for the Police if all the Police players are new players and you have an experienced Ripper, so give the game a few times to learn all the routes. Interestingly enough the game should be equally playable (if not more so) with 2 players only as the Police can all be controlled by a single player without problem. Playing with a limited number of Police players may also speed things up a bit.

Overall it is a pretty good game, but the stripped down gameplay may not be for everyone. If you are content with figuring out movement patterns and don’t want to bog down with combat and other factors then Letters of Whitechapel is the game for you. If you on the other hand want more to do during your turn then you should perhaps consider Fury of Dracula instead.

Letters from Whitechapel: 7/10